Educating, Informing and Inspiring Young People in Schools for the Regeneration and Conservation of Nature. 

 
Amur tiger,  Panthera tigris altaica  © Lesley Malpas, 2017. There are estimated to be around 600 Amur tigers left in the wild. Captive breeding programmes are providing protection against extinction for this species, but habitat protection, and the end of illegal wildlife trafficking of their body parts, are essential if the species is to have any chance of future survival in the wild. Photo by Lesley Malpas.

Amur tiger, Panthera tigris altaica © Lesley Malpas, 2017. There are estimated to be around 600 Amur tigers left in the wild. Captive breeding programmes are providing protection against extinction for this species, but habitat protection, and the end of illegal wildlife trafficking of their body parts, are essential if the species is to have any chance of future survival in the wild. Photo by Lesley Malpas.

What We Do

Conservation Education and Rewilding Programmes for Schools.

Operation Future Hope is a dynamic conservation teaching programme that delivers ecological and environmental learning to young people.  Portraying the most pressing issues of today, the programme is designed to re-establish a connection with nature, and to inspire, encourage and motivate young people to take action at both individual and group level. 

The Operation Future Hope programme is on the pulse of current environmental and conservation issues, with the goal of equipping the next generation to make informed choices about the way they will live their own lives and operate in the commercial world.  The programme provides a platform for the active exchange of ideas and aims to mobilise young people to become the drivers of change towards a regenerative culture.

Teaching young people to 'Think globally & Act locally'

The Operation Future Hope Rewilding programme enables schools to restore and create habitat for wildlife within their school grounds, putting conservation and the regeneration of nature right at the heart of school life.

"Environmental education has failed because it is not keeping pace with environmental degradation."

Charles Saylan, Marine Conservationist

The Hard Facts

The World Wildlife Fund and the Zoological Society of London's Living Planet Report makes terrifying reading. In 2012, human consumption for one year required ecosystem services and resources equivalent to 1.7 Earths. By the end of that same year, we had seen a 58% decline of all vertebrate species monitored between the years 1970 and 2012.  The trend is continuing; the 2018 Living Planet Report report showed an increase to 62% decline - on our current trajectory we will have caused the loss of 67% of land and marine species by the end of this year.  Invertebrates are also disappearing, with populations falling by 75% across Europe and as much as 98% in a recent study in the Luquillo rainforest in Puerto Rico. If human pressure continues species such as the African elephant and rhino, and Sumatran orangutang, tiger, elephant and rhino population are set to become extinct in the wild within the next 10 years

The question for young people who are about to go out into the world and become employers and employees, husbands and wives, fathers and mothers - do they know about these facts, do they really understand what is happening to their world and why?

If the next generation are not informed about the impact of human conflict with wildlife, and our unsustainable consumption of the planet's ecosystems services and resources, then they are very likely to do nothing to redress the situation.  Now is the time to empower young people with information that will inspire them to create the change that the scientific and conservation communities know we so desperately need; there is still time to save nature and the species that are critically endangered today, but we must act now.

"The next generation has the ability and capacity to create new solutions, to generate new ideas, and to develop into the leaders, pioneers and educators that society needs in order to bring about the shift to a regenarative culture across the world."  

Lesley Malpas, Founder, Operation Future Hope.

Sumatran Orangutan,  Pongo abelii , photographed by Paul Hilton. 69% of Orangutan habitat and half the population has been lost in one generation; Sumatran Orangutans will be extinct in the wild within the next 10 years if current levels of deforestation continue.

Sumatran Orangutan, Pongo abelii, photographed by Paul Hilton. 69% of Orangutan habitat and half the population has been lost in one generation; Sumatran Orangutans will be extinct in the wild within the next 10 years if current levels of deforestation continue.

Our mission is to deliver a call to action to the next generation and provide an exemplar for living and growth within planetary boundaries.

62%

of vertebrate species lost in the last 40 years.

1.7 

Earths now required to meet our demand for ecosystem services and resources. 

90%

of seabirds have plastic in their stomachs.

We are creating a tribe, a movement of young people, who are reconnected to nature and understand their place in the natural order of life.  At its heart, Operation Future Hope is a springboard, a platform for the next generation to be able to connect with others around the world, both in the field of science, conservation, and within society in order to form a united, formidable force that will take responsibility to care for the whole community of life on earth - that is to act in the interests of all species, not just our own.  

African Elephant,  Loxidonta africana, © Lesley Malpas. Elephants are expected to become extinct in the wild within the next 10 years if the current level of poaching continues.

African Elephant, Loxidonta africana,© Lesley Malpas. Elephants are expected to become extinct in the wild within the next 10 years if the current level of poaching continues.

It is possible to stop the ongoing destruction of the remaining wildlife and wild areas, but we have to act now and put all our strength in it.
— Alexander Mobbrucker, Sumatran Elephant Conservation Initiative.